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Birds of Queensland - #7 - Tin Can Bay Region

contributed by cougar15
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Birds of Queensland - #3 - Bli Bli Laughing Kookaburra, Bli Bli, QLD

Birds of Queensland - #7 – Tin Can Bay Region

Birds of Queensland - #7 - Tin Can Bay Region Torresian Crow, Inskip Point, QLD

We have just returned from a day-trip to the townships of Tin Can Bay and Rainbow Beach and, then, to Inskip Point.

Birds of Queensland - #1 - Brisbane Region Whistling Kite, Oxley Creek Common, Rocklea, QLD

Whilst we had briefly visited this region a few years back, I was anxious to explore the ‘Tin Can Bay Foreshore Bird Walk’ following research on the internet (which included glowing reports from enthusiastic blogging birders).

A brochure with more detail on the walk may be obtained from -

Birds of Queensland - #5 – Goondiwindi / Dalby Region Little Pied Cormorant, Kilcoy, QLD

http://www.birdingcooloola.org.au/uploads/8/2/4/2/8242731/brochure_-_tcb_foreshore_bird_walk.pdf

Birds of Queensland - #5 – Goondiwindi / Dalby Region Pied Butcherbird, Natural Heritage & Water Park, Goondiwindi, QLD

I commenced this walk in Les Lee Park (at the northern end of the Esplanade) and headed south. It was low tide and I could make out a pair of Whimbrels and a Gull-billed Tern feeding way off in the distance where sections of the estuary were deep enough to trap a few bodies of water.

At first, I was disappointed that the tide was out so far as to limit my photo opportunities but it didn’t last long as I soon came across numerous different species of birdlife amongst the ever changing foreshore vegetation.

Birds of Queensland - #2 - Mooloolaba Region Pied Cormorant, Mooloolaba, QLD

I was more than happy to continue walking along the foreshore path / bush-track (for some 3 hours) as the birdlife was so varied. Indeed, I would have liked to stay longer. However, I was also keen to head over to Inskip Point while there was sufficient daylight before returning to our holiday accommodation in Mooloolaba.

Birds of Queensland - #1 - Brisbane Region Australian Pelican, Sherwood Arboretum Park, Sherwood, QLD

At Tin Can Bay I also came across – Australian Magpie, Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike, Blue-faced, Brown, Lewin’s, Mangrove and White-throated Honeyeaters, Brahminy and Whistling Kites, Crested Pigeon, Eastern Curlew, Eastern Yellow Robin, Little Wattlebird, Noisy Friarbird, Pied Butcherbird, Pied Oystercatcher, Rainbow Bee-eater, Rufous Whistler, Silver Gull, Spangled Drongo, Spotted Turtle-dove, White-faced Heron and Willy Wagtail.

One of the Whistling Kites was nesting in a tall gumtree next to the relatively busy foreshore Esplanade.

My next birding stop was over at Inskip Point (at the end of the sealed road which leads to the car-ferry operating between the mainland and Fraser Island).

There is a well worn (good birding) track near the final parking bays. It takes you through the foreshore vegetation to a large expanse of sand near the ferry terminus.

Birds of Queensland - #2 - Mooloolaba Region Australian Pelican, Mooloolah River, Mooloolaba, QLD

In the half hour we were there, I came across – Australian Brush-turkey, Australian Pelican, Eastern Curlew, Eastern Yellow Robin, Great and Pied Cormorants, Lewin’s and White-cheeked Honeyeaters, Little Shrike-thrush, Little Wattlebird, Red-capped Plover, Silver Gull, Torresian Crow and Whistling Kite.

On a previous visit, we saw several lace monitors and numerous Red-backed Fairy-wrens in this area but none presented on this occasion.

Of the two birding sites, Tin Can Bay is an absolute standout but you need a lot more time than I had to do it justice.

I certainly hope to return one day !!!

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